7 Funny (but Practical) Tips to Maximize Your Savings

I’ve asked Reddit for their opinion on how members think the best way to spend their Christmas Bonuses. Surprisingly, received a funny but practical response from user send_me_more_ram, which is applicable not only for the upcoming holiday seasons, but to the remaining days ahead.

Some of which you might be able to relate. Here they are:

Tips on Where to Spend Your Christmas Bonus

– Pay off debts whether they may be credit card debts, 5/6 debts, or loans from friends/family

– put a portion in long term savings/investments

Tips on Spending Less

1. if you want to spend less, sleep more. Sleep costs nothing and gives you energy. You can also go to your local church and pray or meditate. It’s free and you may get the gods to be in your favor

2. if you want to spend less and want to lose weight? Skip your dinners for 3km walks and go to bed early before the hunger pains kick in. You’ll lose 8lbs per month and save around P1,500-3,000 on the dinners you’ve skipped, and you’ll feel healthier

3. want to spend less on toiletries? Shit in your office or nice mall bathrooms. Always ask for extra tissues at restaurants or food courts

4. want free ketchup? Always ask for extra ketchups at fastfood stores

5. want to save money on overpriced coffees and frappes from starbucks? Just use your imagination that you’re sipping that dark mocha frappe and its cold frappy goodness is making its way down your through. And then just drink a few cold glasses of water. The craving will go away

6. want to save money? Don’t get a bf/gf. If you do get a bf/gf, make sure you don’t make a baby you can’t afford

7. Want to save a ton of money on beauty and cosmetics, just use a regular bar of soap and avoid the sun like the plague. Beauty companies prey on your insecurities. They want you to know and feel that you’re ugly and that you’re not good enough for your crush or SO. Talk to elders in long term relationships and they’ll tell you that character/ugali would matter more in a relationship, if in the off-chance that your are not very blessed with good looks, you can always shut off the lights during sexy times (but you gotta make sure you’re good in bed)

There are lot of things that we do in order for us to save for a specific thing or a specific event in out lives. Nevertheless, we do work hard to get it. On this journey to financial success, let’s continue to learn how we can balance our present lives with the life that we are about to make in the future.

How about you? What tips can you share on how to save money for future use? Please share them in the comment section below.

4 Things That Kobe Bryant’s Retirement Could Teach Us About Personal Finance

If you are an NBA fan, you might have heard the news that one of the living (and playing) legends of the league announced his retirement last Sunday (Nov 29, 2015). Yes, I’m referring to Kobe Bryant. He’ll be playing only until the end of this season and will start facing a new stage of his life – Retirement.

Of course, we’ll not be talking about the Sports angle of this story. Let’s talk about what we can learn from one person’s story of success and perhaps emulate (on a smaller scale maybe) that could lead us to our own journey to Financial Success.

Here it goes…

Attributes to www.ThePlayersTribune.com
Attributes to www.ThePlayersTribune.com

I. We are not capable of working FOREVER.

Yes, walang FOREVER (no such thing as forever). Everything ends.

As the famous ironic quote says “The only constant thing in life is change”. Our mental and emotional state change, or physical ability deteriorates. This means that we cannot work forever. We cannot keep on depending on our active income to support us for the rest of our lives.

Here’s a more dramatic verse from Kobe’s poem ending his career where he earned a total of $680 Million:

You gave a six-year-old boy his Laker dream
And I’ll always love you for it.
But I can’t love you obsessively for much longer.
This season is all I have left to give.
My heart can take the pounding
My mind can handle the grind
But my body knows it’s time to say goodbye.

That’s the reason why we should and understand the second lesson (and take it seriously).

II. Build a second (third, fourth, fifth, etc…) Income Stream

Specifically, “Less-Active” to PASSIVE Income Stream

Knowing that our body will respond and perform differently when we are young compared to an age of more maturity (and seniority), we have to anticipate how we are going to live past the prime of our lives.

CNN reported that Kobe has earned around $680 Million from his 20-year stint at the NBA, majority of which were earned during the last few years as he acquire the “legend” status. Imagine how much he will be giving up by deciding to retire.

However, aside from his basketball career, Kobe do endorsement stints on the side for well-known brands like NIKE. Coming from a very physical and tiring profession, Kobe will still be able make money from less-active projects.

The lesson here is this, while we take our journey to Professional or Entrepreneurial success, we have to build an income stream that will require less energy and less stress compared to what we are currently doing. Everything should be aligning, our physical deterioration with our financial sources – from an active income, to a less active income, and eventually, to a passive income.

III. Invest in your Passion

Successful and happy people tend to do what they love to do, and that’s what we really want to achieve. At the end of the day, it seems that it will fill good to be wealthy, but it definitely feels good to be happy.

I don’t know where Kobe invests all his money, but based on my research, he have investments that are directly or indirectly related to the sport that he loves.

During 2013, he set up Kobe Inc. with the vision of owning and growing brands and ideas that challenge and redefine the sports industry while inspiring the world. I believe Kobe Inc. is a holding company that invests on other businesses (similar to Ayala Corporation, MPIC, amongst others).

The first investment made by the company was a sports drink called BodyArmorJust this 2015, he teamed up with a venture capital firm to invest in the The Player’s Tribune – a popular website that operate in the sports niche.

While we can make money on various ways, be it active, less-active, or passive sources of income, doing something that we really love will makes everything sustainable, since we are more likely to stick to something we love, through thick or thin, than to something we don’t.

My realization is that on the quest to generate less-active income, it could be an opportunity for us to explore the things that we love to do. Even at this point, say we are in a position that we don’t really like our primary source of income, we could always use our leisure time to make our passion profitable.

Easier said than done, but I remember a quote from some videos that I’ve watched that could inspire you anyway, “Version one is always better than version zero”. It just means that doing something, to achieve our passion in this case, is always better than doing nothing.

IV. Diversify

Diversification does not necessarily apply only to investments, but also to source of income.

With a variety of sources of income, we are able to decide freely on what’s best for us. Relying solely on a single income stream could probably lead to frustration and desperations specially if we don’t love what we do.

 

Top Performing UITFs in the Philippines as of November 30, 2015

Here are the Top Performing UITFs in the Philippines from UITF.com.ph as of November 30, 2015.

Top 5 Equity Funds (Year-to-Date)

Bank Fund Name ROI
1 China Banking Corporation CBC EQUITY FUND -0.47%
2 Bank of the Philippine Islands BPI Philippine High Dividend Equity Fund -1.11%
3 Bank of the Philippine Islands BPI Equity Value Fund -1.99%
4 Asia United Bank Equity Investment Trust Fund -3.15%
5 Union Bank UnionBank Dividend Play Equity Portfolio -3.58%

Top 5 Balanced Funds  (Year-to-Date)

Bank Fund Name ROI
1 Philippine Bank of Communications BEST BALANCED FUND 0.67%
2 Robinsons Bank RBank Balanced Fund 0.15%
3 Bank of the Philippine Islands BPI Balanced Fund -0.27%
4 LandBank of the Philippines Growth Fund -0.91%
5 China Banking Corporation CBC BALANCED FUND -1.46%

Top 5 Intermediate Term Bond Funds (Year-to-Date)

Bank Fund Name ROI
1 Union Bank UnionBank Medium Term Fixed Income Portfolio 2.20%
Portfolio Duration: 2.28 year(s) as of 2nd quarter of 2015
2 Union Bank UnionBank Infinity Prime Fund 2.13%
Portfolio Duration: 2.41 year(s) as of 2nd quarter of 2015
3 China Banking Corporation CBC INTERMEDIATE FIXED-INCOME FUND 1.30%
Portfolio Duration: 0.26 year(s) as of 3rd quarter of 2015
4 Bank of the Philippine Islands BPI Premium Bond Fund 0.95%
Portfolio Duration: 1.26 year(s) as of 2nd quarter of 2015
5 EastWest Banking Corporation EastWest Peso Intermediate Term Bond Fund 0.89%
Portfolio Duration: 1.56 year(s) as of 3rd quarter of 2015

Top 5 Medium Term Bond Funds (Year-to-Date)

Bank Fund Name ROI
1 BDO Unibank, Inc. BDO PESO FIXED INCOME FUND 3.08%
Portfolio Duration: 3.10 year(s) as of 3rd quarter of 2015
2 BDO Unibank, Inc. BDO PESO BOND FUND 2.62%
Portfolio Duration: 3.02 year(s) as of 3rd quarter of 2015
3 Union Bank UnionBank Philippine Peso Fixed Income Portfolio 1.94%
Portfolio Duration: 3.97 year(s) as of 2nd quarter of 2015
4 Asia United Bank Peso Investment Trust Fund 1.60%
5 BDO Unibank, Inc. BDO MERIT FUND MEDIUM TERM PORTFOLIO 1.56%
Portfolio Duration: 3.31 year(s) as of 3rd quarter of 2015

Top 5 Long Term Bond Funds (Year-to-Date)

Bank Fund Name ROI
1 AB Capital AB CAPITAL PREMIUM FUND 6.34%
Portfolio Duration: 1.09 year(s) as of 3rd quarter of 2015
2 Union Bank UnionBank Long Term Fixed Income Portfolio 3.38%
Portfolio Duration: 4.44 year(s) as of 2nd quarter of 2015
3 Union Bank UnionBank Tax Exempt Portfolio 2.35%
Portfolio Duration: 2.65 year(s) as of 2nd quarter of 2015
4 Rizal Commercial Banking Corporation RIZAL PESO BOND FUND 0.49%
Portfolio Duration: 3.37 year(s) as of 3rd quarter of 2015
5 Security Bank Corporation SB PESO BOND FUND 0.02%
Portfolio Duration: 7.90 year(s) as of 3rd quarter of 2015

Disclaimer: Past performance is not an indication of future results. There are several risks associated with investing in mutual funds/UITF which are further discussed and enumerated in the fund’s prospectus. Please read the fund’s prospectus before you start investing. 

Three Personal Finance Rockstars in the Philippines that you Should Follow in Social Media

Social Media has been one of the major reasons for the continues growth of Financial Literacy here in the Philippines.

Though I may not have the exact number, but curiosity and interest in managing finances effectively has increased tremendously over the past several years. This is evidenced by various organisations that are popping out trying to further increase awareness of Financial Literacy.

However, with the increasing number of groups/individuals to follow, the question of who’s really the real deal may arise. With that, here are the top four people in my Facebook Newsfeed that I don’t fail to learn something new.

Personal Finance Rockstars

Bo Sanchez (Facebook)

Bo SanchezWith his free ebook My Maid Invests in the Stock Market, the preacher in blue jeans has inspired a lot of Filipinos to invest in the stock market. He somehow erased the idea that the stock market is for the reach only. Upon reading the said ebook, his readers ends up asking, “if his maids can invest in the stock market, why can’t I?”.

Over the years, retail investors in the stock market slowly increase, which really gives hope on our Philippine Stock Market for future enormous growth.

One thing about Bo Sanchez is that he is a Preacher. Nope, he’s not a priest, but a layman who finds his mission to preach the word of the Lord to a surprisingly huge crowd of people who follows his faith organization.

Why follow Bo?

Bo Sanchez’s approach in teaching about money is by integrating it with the teachings of the Holy Bible. I’m not a very religious person, but when I attend The Feast (Bo Sanchez’s weekly Prayer Meeting), discussions about money provides more meaning on a wider universe, rather than the pursuit of it for thyself.

Chinkee Tan (Facebook | Youtube | Viber)

Was once known as one of the “Hawi Boys” of the once popular Randy Santiago, Chinkee Tan offers a story of how life can turn around from poverty to a life of abundance.

Here’s an interview of Korina Sanchez with Chinkee last 2007 for you to learn more about him:

Aside from show business, Chinkee Tan’s background includes coming from the Network Marketing business – such background provided him insights on how to really help people not only on managing money, but also in providing business ideas that helps his audience have something to manage.

One of the things I like about Chinkee Tan is the he is VERY ACTIVE in social media, especially in Facebook. If you are following him at Facebook, you will often receive notifications that he is doing a live broadcast using Facebook Live, sharing some small bits of information that could motivate and inspire people into taking action.

I really appreciate this guy’s energy in trying to uplift the Filipino people the best way he can.

He’s very active in radio broadcasts too. You can hear him talk at Radio 5 early morning on weekends.

Randell Tiongson (Facebook | Viber)

Randell TiongsonThe very first time I encountered Randell Tiongson was when I took the Financial Planning modules conducted by the Registered Financial Planners of the Philippines (RFP) way back in 2010/2011.

Randell’s background was on the Financial Advisory business worked as an Insurance Agent for several years (don’t know exactly how long, but I know it’s a very long and extensive experience). His insights came from various experiences with different people and clients.

He is currently the Director of the RFP Philippines, guiding Financial Planners with the proper pillars of financial planning, which will then be used in guiding their clients, families, and especially, themselves.

Randell regularly posts upcoming seminars of different Personal Finance personalities and leads a Viber Chat (together with some interesting personalities) where we can gain  insights on the world of personal finance.

Of course, these people are my personal choices.

How about you? Who do you like following in Social Media? Please share them in the comment section below.

PIME 004: Everything You Need to Know in Investing in Mutual Funds in the Philippines – Q&A Part 2

In this session, we continue to talk about the frequently asked questions that I receive from different Filipinos around the world regarding the subject of Investing in Mutual Funds in the Philippines.

If you missed the first part of this series, you can just visit Pinoy Investing Made Easy Podcast No. 3 so you can have a solid base in understanding this session.

Here are the questions that I’ve tried to answer with the hope of further strengthening your knowledge about mutual funds.

  • How much do I need to open a Mutual Fund account?
  • Am I required to make additional investments every month in my mutual fund investment?
  • Can OFWs open a mutual fund account even if they are still out of the country?
  • How will I know which mutual fund company to choose?
  • What are the charges/fees involved in investing in Mutual Funds?

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In this podcast, we’ve mentioned the following links:

 

PIME 003: Everything You Need to Know in Investing in Mutual Funds in the Philippines – Q&A

In this session, we talk about the frequently asked questions in investing in mutual funds herein the Philippines.

This session is for you if:

  • You haven’t heard anything yet with mutual funds but are open to learning new things that could benefit you and your family.
  • You are considering to invest in mutual funds but very apprehensive to start because of fear due to lack of knowledge
  • You have already started but hungry to obtain deeper knowledge about mutual funds so you can take advantage of your investment and make the most out of it.

This session is the first of the series of podcasts that will tackle the frequently asked questions that I have encountered while talking about Mutual Funds for the last 5 years through my blog MutualFundPhilippines.com.

For this part 1, we were able to answer the following questions:

  1. What are Mutual Funds?
  2. How does it work?
  3. Can I instruct the fund manager on where I want my money to be invested?
  4. How can I make money from Mutual Funds?
  5. Why do the price per share of Mutual Funds (NAVPS) increase or decrease?
  6. How can I start investing in Mutual Funds?

Here are the links mentioned in this podcast session:

  • Steps on how to invest in mutual funds in the Philippines (here)
  • Philippine Investment Funds Association (PIFA) – www.PIFA.com.ph

For the continuation of this series, you may check out Session No. 4 for more questions answered in a very detailed manner.

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PIME 002: Where to Start Your Journey to Financial Independence?

Starting something always feel difficult and uncomfortable. That’s same for any life experience as it is in money.

In this session, we’ve tackled the first things that we need to understand and accept before really taking the road to financial independence.

Busting the myth: “Money is the root of evil”

Blaming money for most terrible things that happen in life is one of our favourite excuse in failing to manage it correctly. After all, most of us believe that Money is the root of evil.

Contrary that, we have to understand that money is just a tool that does not have life on its own. It is whom who use it has the morality of being good or bad – it us, people.

It is about being a good or a bad person, not a good or a bad money.

In this session, I compared money to a knife.

A knife is a tool often used in cooking our meals – used in cutting meat, chopping vegetables, etc… However, that same knife is used by some people to commit murder and some use it in threatening other people.

Again, there are good and bad people, not good and bad things (money).

The Pillars of Financial Foundation

Once we have accepted that money is just a tool. The next best step is to educate ourselves on how to manage it and how to make it work for us, and not against us (debts).

I. Build an Emergency Fund

We have a habit of giving our own definition of emergencies. The need to buy a luxury bag that is on a DISCOUNT is not an emergency!

Emergency fund aims to safeguard your investments by being the second line of defence in case emergencies happen – the REAL emergencies. I’ve mentioned “second line of defence” since insurance are really the first line defence.

As a rule of thumb, we have to keep at least 3 to 6 months worth of our monthly expenses.

II. Get Protection through Insurance (Life, health, and the necessary non-life)

Insurance stands as our first line of defence to Financial Stress.

During time of need, say you will be hospitalized, or in a vehicular accident, what comes first thing to mind? Insurance, definitely.

Insurance protects us from spending a huge chunk of money during sickness, accidents, and other life’s contingencies. It protects our emergency fund from being spent, avoiding any unnecessary financial stress in the process.

Once both insurance and emergency funds are in place, you’re now ready to invest.

III. Make Money Work for you by Investing

Investments aid us in making our money work for us. We worked so hard to earn money. It’s just right to make money work for us, real hard.

There are various forms of investments. We can invest in our own business, stocks, mutual funds, etc…

Let’s discuss them in future sessions.

IV. Prepare for transferring wealth (Legacy)

After accumulating these wealth, at one point in our lives, we have to transfer them to our heirs/loved ones. If transferring wealth is just as easy as abc, then there’s no need to prepare.

But this is a complex aspect of personal finance, especially if the government is involved.

In the future sessions, let’s talk about Estate Tax.

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PIME 001: Welcome to the Pinoy Investing Made Easy Podcast

Pinoy Investing Made Easy

Welcome to the very first episode of Pinoy Investing Made Easy Podcast. Yehey!

For eight (8) years, I’ve been sharing a lot of things that I know and things that I continue to learn through articles (blog posts).

I’ve been contemplating to add a new medium in sharing my knowledge that could benefit my readers. After a long thinking and self-convincing, I’m publishing my very first podcast. 🙂

So, what’s Pinoy Investing Made Easy Podcast all about?

Well, check it out by hitting the play button! 🙂

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Top Performing UITFs in the Philippines as of October 31, 2015

Unit Investment Trust Funds, popularly referred to as UITFs are pooled funds similar to Mutual Funds, only it is managed by Banks.

Here are the Top Performing UITFs in the Philippines from UITF.com.ph as of October 31, 2015.

Top 5 Equity Funds (Year-to-Date)

Bank Fund Name ROI
China Banking Corporation CBC EQUITY FUND 2.43%
Bank of the Philippine Islands BPI Philippine High Dividend Equity Fund 1.99%
Bank of the Philippine Islands BPI Equity Value Fund 1.20%
Asia United Bank Equity Investment Trust Fund -0.17%
Philippine National Bank AUP EQUITY FUND -0.71%

Top 5 Balanced Funds  (Year-to-Date)

Bank Fund Name ROI
Robinsons Bank RBank Balanced Fund 1.51%
Bank of the Philippine Islands BPI Balanced Fund 1.51%
Philippine Bank of Communications BEST BALANCED FUND 1.34%
China Banking Corporation CBC BALANCED FUND 0.69%
Development Bank of the Philippines GINTONG SIKAP SECURE FUND 0.61%

Top 5 Intermediate Term Bond Funds (Year-to-Date)

Bank Fund Name ROI
Union Bank UnionBank Infinity Prime Fund 2.63%
Portfolio Duration: 2.41 year(s) as of 2nd quarter of 2015
Union Bank UnionBank Medium Term Fixed Income Portfolio 2.48%
Portfolio Duration: 2.28 year(s) as of 2nd quarter of 2015
Security Bank Corporation SB INTERMEDIATE TERM PESO BOND FUND 2.27%
Portfolio Duration: 1.84 year(s) as of 3rd quarter of 2015
Metropolitan Bank & Trust Co. Metro Max-3 Bond Fund 1.37%
Portfolio Duration: 2.35 year(s) as of 2nd quarter of 2015
Bank of the Philippine Islands BPI Premium Bond Fund 1.36%
Portfolio Duration: 1.26 year(s) as of 2nd quarter of 2015

Top 5 Medium Term Bond Funds (Year-to-Date)

Bank Fund Name ROI
BDO Unibank, Inc. BDO PESO FIXED INCOME FUND 3.42%
Portfolio Duration: 3.10 year(s) as of 3rd quarter of 2015
Asia United Bank Peso Investment Trust Fund 3.09%
BDO Unibank, Inc. BDO PESO BOND FUND 2.94%
Portfolio Duration: 3.02 year(s) as of 3rd quarter of 2015
Union Bank UnionBank Philippine Peso Fixed Income Portfolio 2.43%
Portfolio Duration: 3.97 year(s) as of 2nd quarter of 2015
BDO Unibank, Inc. BDO MERIT FUND MEDIUM TERM PORTFOLIO 1.67%
Portfolio Duration: 3.31 year(s) as of 3rd quarter of 2015

Top 5 Long Term Bond Funds (Year-to-Date)

Bank Fund Name ROI
AB Capital AB CAPITAL PREMIUM FUND 6.35%
Portfolio Duration: 1.09 year(s) as of 3rd quarter of 2015
Union Bank UnionBank Long Term Fixed Income Portfolio 4.37%
Portfolio Duration: 4.44 year(s) as of 2nd quarter of 2015
Union Bank UnionBank Tax Exempt Portfolio 3.24%
Portfolio Duration: 2.65 year(s) as of 2nd quarter of 2015
Security Bank Corporation SB PESO BOND FUND 2.13%
Portfolio Duration: 7.90 year(s) as of 3rd quarter of 2015
Bank of the Philippine Islands ABF Philippines Bond Index Fund 1.99%
Portfolio Duration: 7.61 year(s) as of 2nd quarter of 2015

Disclaimer: Past performance is not an indication of future results. There are several risks associated with investing in mutual funds/UITF which are further discussed and enumerated in the fund’s prospectus. Please read the fund’s prospectus before you start investing. 

Top Mutual Funds in the Philippines as of October 31, 2015

As of October 31, 2015, the Philippines has a total of 54 active Mutual Fund Companies as per Philippine Investment Fund Association (PIFA).

top performing mutual funds in the philippines
Top 5 Equity Funds Year To Date

  Fund Name NAVPS YTD Return
1 Philequity Dividend Yield Fund, Inc. 1.2138 26.04%
2 United Fund, Inc. 3.2892 1.15%
3 First Metro Save and Learn Equity Fund,Inc. 5.5523 -0.36%
4 Philippine Stock Index Fund Corp. 802.56 -0.47%
5 Philequity PSE Index Fund Inc. 4.7688 -0.97%

Updated Nov 12, 2015: PIFA has updated their website showing a -3.42% YTD loss for Philequity Dividend Yield Fund Inc.

Top 5 Balanced Funds Year To Date

Fund Name NAVPS YTD Return
1 Cocolife Dollar Fund Builder, Inc. $0.03539 2.28%
2 Bahay Pari Solidaritas Fund, Inc. 2.0473 0.65%
3 First Metro Save and Learn Balanced Fund Inc. 2.7959 -0.15%
4 One Wealthy Nation Fund, Inc. 1.0263 -1.22%
5 Sun Life Prosperity Dollar Advantage Fund, Inc. $3.1616 -1.43%

Top 5 Bond Funds Year To Date

Fund Name NAVPS YTD Return
1 Cocolife Fixed Income Fund, Inc. 2.5223 4.21%
2 ATRAM Total Return Dollar Bond Fund Inc. $1.0989 3.41%
3 Philam Dollar Bond Fund, Inc. $2.1355 2.90%
4 ALFM Dollar Bond Fund, Inc. $418.61 2.54%
5 Sun Life of Canada Prosperity Bond Fund, Inc. 2.7686 2.51%

Top 10 Mutual Funds in the Philippines as of October 31, 2015 as to 5-Year Return

Fund Name Fund Type NAVPS 5 yr. Return
1 Philequity PSE Index Fund Inc. Equity Fund 4.7688 12.02%
2 Philequity Fund, Inc. Equity Fund 35.0043 11.92%
3 Philippine Stock Index Fund Corp. Equity Fund 802.56 11.90%
4 First Metro Save and Learn Equity Fund,Inc. Equity Fund 5.5523 9.88%
5 NCM Mutual Fund of the Phils., Inc Balanced Fund 1.8273 9.23%
6 First Metro Save and Learn Fixed Income Fund,Inc. Bond Fund 2.2211 9.18%
7 Sun Life Prosperity Philippine Equity Fund, Inc. Equity Fund 3.9723 8.92%
8 Bahay Pari Solidaritas Fund, Inc. Balanced Fund 2.0473 8.46%
9 ATRAM Dynamic Allocation Fund, Inc. Balanced Fund 1.7953 8.33%
10 First Metro Save and Learn Balanced Fund Inc. Balanced Fund 2.7959 7.33%

Disclaimer: Past performance is not an indication of future results. There are several risks associated with investing in mutual funds which are further discussed and enumerated in the fund’s prospectus. Please read the fund’s prospectus before you start investing.